Category Archives: Primate rehabilitation

EMERGENCY APPEAL – CERCOPAN’s gates are closing

Robotta

144 Monkeys at risk

CERCOPAN is issuing a one-time emergency appeal to save the lives of 144 monkeys under its care in Calabar, Nigeria. For 20 years, CERCOPAN has provided safe haven and rehabilitation for monkeys rescued from the bushmeat, illegal wildlife, and pet trade – monkeys like Robotta and Action (left).

Unfortunately, a primary donor for the past several years has been unable to support us for more than

12 months now, and therefore, grants that required matching funds have been withdrawn. Without this income, CERCOPAN has no option but to close its rescue centre – placing all of our monkeys at risk.

Experts from an international task force have been on the ground and assessed the situation. The task force has recommended releasing some monkeys to the wild and re-homing others, dependent on such factors as conservation need and a monkey’s health and age. However, this will take time and proper planning. We stand a chance to save all our monkeys if we can just feed and care for them over the coming months while resources are obtained for release and re-homing efforts.

Donations are  crucial to save primate lives

Donations are crucial to save primate lives

We found Robotta after she had been forced to live at a petrol station for the first year of her life, completely unaware that other monkeys existed and unable to learn basic skills like how to feed herself. Now, she is rehabilitated and living with her own kind in a social group. Robotta and more than 300 other monkeys have been saved and nurtured by CERCOPAN’s dedicated team since the organization’s inception.

Please, can you help us ensure that Robotta and friends live out the lives they deserve?

Donations are crucial to save the lives of these 144 beautiful and threatened monkeys.

All funds raised will be used solely for critical primate care during this interim period.

PLEASE SEND YOUR DONATIONS TO THE EMERGENCY FUND:

http://www.everyclick.com/cercopan/info (also has GiftAid for U.K. donations)

http://www.humanewildlife.org/cercopan.html (provides receipt for U.S. tax records)

 Contact in Europe time zone: Zena Tooze

([email protected]; [email protected]; +44-777-610-1492)

Contact in Australia time zone: Claire Coulson
([email protected]; [email protected]; +61-469-374338)

Emergency Appeal to Save African Monkeys – Nearly 150 Lives at Risk

Mangabeys CERCOPAN appeal

Red- Capped Mangabeys at CERCOPAN

A rescue center in Nigeria that provides rehabilitation and safe haven for monkeys rescued from the bushmeat, illegal wildlife, and pet trades is urgently calling for help and has established an Emergency Fund to support the care and feeding of its 144 resident monkeys.

After many years of successfully rescuing and caring for primates in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria, CERCOPAN has been severely affected by the world recession and is compelled to close down its rescue center. Financial support is urgently needed to feed and care for the monkeys, while funding is sought to implement a plan (developed with the help of an expert international task force) that aims to: 1) phase out CERCOPAN’s main rescue facility, and 2) implement a conservation programme to release some monkey species into a protected forest in Cross River State.

CERCOPAN has taken key steps to reduce expenditures to ensure that all money is directed to the critical needs of primate care. The organization is also seeking to manage the forest site and primate reintroduction program.

Donations  to  the  Emergency  Fund can  now  be  made  online  by  visiting any of these Internet sites:

http://www.everyclick.com/cercopan/info (also has GiftAid for UK donations)

http://www.humanewildlife.org/cercopan.html (provides receipt for U.S. tax records)

http://cercopan.wildlifedirect.org

https://www.justgiving.com/cercopan/donate

Donations can also be made via cash or check, through the contacts listed below.

Donations are crucial to save the lives of these 144 beautiful and threatened monkeys.

Contact in Europe time zone:

Zena Tooze

[email protected]

[email protected]

+44-777-610-1492

Contact in Australia time zone:

Claire Coulson

[email protected]

[email protected]

+61-469-374-338

About CERCOPAN:

For 20 years, CERCOPAN has operated an environmental conservation programme focused on the forests and primates of Cross River State, Nigeria. Throughout this time, CERCOPAN has partnered with other environmental charities, village communities, and the Cross River State Government.

For much of the past 20 years, the organization provided the only formal environmental education programme within Cross River State and reached more than 20,000 individuals a year, with a particular emphasis on school children and university students. The conservation messages in this programme emphasized preservation of the forests of southeast Nigeria for its people and its primate fauna.

For 14 years, CERCOPAN has partnered with the community of Iko Esai to protect 20,000 ha of forest from logging and primate hunting. Sustainable forest management practices, community development projects, a purpose-built community centre, eco-tourism, and employment of local village residents comprise some of the benefits to Iko Esai. In 2010, two neighbouring communities signed conservation by-laws, expanding the protected forest area to 30,000 contiguous hectares.

In 2008, together with partner NGOs, CERCOPAN advised and encouraged the State Government to prioritise environmental conservation within Cross River, and it responded with a state-wide logging ban, actively enforced since its inception.

Since 2009, CERCOPAN has partnered with the Cross River State Forestry Commission to help bring Nigeria through the Observer and Partnering stages of the United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD) programme. Planning (with UN funding) is now underway for a pilot implementation within the communities centred on Iko Esai.

Finally, CERCOPAN has several threatened species in its care, including red-eared monkeys (Cercopithecus erythrotis), the only group of captive Sclater’s monkeys (Cercopithecus sclateri) in the world, and the largest group of red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) globally.

About primates:

Primates (monkeys, apes, and prosimians) are intelligent and socially complex animals, but tragically 50% are threatened with extinction due to human activities. Non-human primates are an integral part of the ecosystems in which they live and are sometimes called the “gardeners of the forest,” as the health of their habitats depend on the presence of healthy primate populations. In turn, these same forests help regulate our global climate, and hence humans are also dependent on these threatened animals.

Reintroducing Robotta

Robotta the Red Eared Guenon CERCOPANThe last few weeks at CERCOPAN have been very difficult, after beloved Red Eared guenon ‘Robotta’  became very ill and seemed unable to move her back legs. As soon as we noticed the first symptoms, she was moved into the office for constant observation and we began a course of medication and extreme TLC. In complete contrast to mangabeys, when guenons fall ill, they tend to become depressed and not want to eat or drink, which makes them feel even worse and want to eat even less.  Our challenge is therefore to keep them eating and drinking no matter how sorry for themselves they feel. Thankfully we have a few tricks up our sleeve – baby food made with milk and honey, smoothies made with all of their favourite fruits, foods that are of interest as they have never encountered them before and a list of the things we know each animal likes best. If the monkeys wont take the food themselves, we encourage by hand feeding, syringe feeding and presenting different options throughout the day until we succeed – sometimes I think they start eating simply because they realise it is the easier option as we are even more stubborn than they are!

Robotta and Rudolpha interact through the mesh

When Robotta first arrived at CERCOPAN, she was so sick we thought we would not be able to pull her through. She surprised us all, when after a period of intensive care not only did she make a full recovery, she quickly became the largest and most dominant baby in quarantine! Thankfully Robotta had the same response to treatment on this occasion and within a matter of weeks was fit, active, using her legs and ready to return to her group. As she was away from the other red-eared guenons for some time however, we had to slowly reintroduce her. This is because when you remove any monkey, even it is only for a few weeks, the dynamics of group can change and the primate may not receive the warm welcome home you would expect.

As a first step we placed Robotta in the satellite of the enclosure, so all animals could interact through the mesh. After a couple days of observations, we let Robotta out into the group but quickly removed her when Rudolpha and Flexi, began giving her a hard time. With Robotta again separated,we  introduced Rudolpha independently and by the end of the day they were mutually grooming one another.  Flexi, the youngest of the group, is still not sure what to think of Robotta’s return, but we are sure he will come around over the next few days and thankfully life in the Red eared group will return to normal.

If you would like to help us care for the Red Eared Guenons at CERCOPAN, please consider adopting Robotta’s group today http://cercopan.org/adopt/