Tag Archives: cute

Angelica

Angelica is one of our newest orphans, she arrived late August (see August 24th article). She is a female Red Eared Guenon, only found in Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Nigeria.

She was found by rangers from Iko Esai’s surveillance team when they were patrolling the community forest. Angelica was tied to a hunting shed, but no hunter was around and her mother was nowhere to be seen – likely she has been killed for meat. The rangers brought Angelica back to our forest camp, Rhoko. There she was looked after by volunteers for a couple of days, and was sent to Calabar with the truck to receive proper medical attention and care. At first, she was hardly using her rear legs and we were afraid she might have a permanent injury, but this turned out not to be the case. She now uses her legs correctly.

Angelica, a few days after she was rescued

During the first days in Calabar, Angelica was very shy and needed a lot of attention. She had to be carried by someone (a substitute mother) at all times, and would start screaming and crying as soon as you would (try to) leave her alone! The only moments of rest for her caretaker was when she was asleep! After 5 days she became more confident and started to wander a few meters away on her own. After a week, a Mona guenon orphan was brought to us, Evie, and they were put together. Evie, being a bit bigger and extremely playful, was a bit “too much” for Angelica at first, as she did not like Evie’s jumping displays. Eventually, Evie understood that Angelica was not up for games, but only for cuddles! And they became very close friends. Actually, Angelica seems to have taken Evie as her new mother, clinging onto her belly the way baby monkeys do with their mothers. Her removal from her real mother has definitely traumatised her, and she is now panicking at the idea of losing her “second mother”, Evie. If we separate them even shortly, she will scream and will not stop calling and looking for Evie until they are reunited! She is a strong minded little monkey, she knows what she wants (whether it be Evie, or a hug from her!) and lets everybody around her know it too 🙂

Angelica (left) and Evie (right) cuddling

Bingo was her name-o

Now that rainy season is upon us, the general mood of staff, volunteers, and monkeys in Calabar is a little glum compared with the recent sunshine-filled days of dry season. Damp staff clean out enclosures where soggy monkeys peep down from under their roof shelters, and everyone is waiting and hoping for some sun to brighten their day.

Last week however, a little ray of sunshine entered the compound in the form of a tiny, mischievous putty-nosed guenon, who was brought in by a concerned member of the public. After seeing the little orphan terrified and alone at a market, the gentleman had felt so sorry for her, that he bought her immediately and carried her straight to CERCOPAN (Centre for Education, Research and Conservation of Primates and Nature) to give her a better life.

The man had carried the baby to us in a small cardboard box and on seeing me, he opened the lid and the tiny creature cautiously peeped out her head. The sight of several pairs of human eyes and the backdrop of primate enclosures filled with animals all staring at her was overwhelming and she she quickly lept out and hid behind her rescuers legs.

Nervously Bingo peeks out from behind her rescuer’s legs.

Egu, our head keeper quickly brought over a plate of food and I tried to tempt out the nervous infant; hoping to win her over with some tasty treats. As fear slowly gave way to hunger, she gradually tiptoed out and stood in awe of the big plate of food put before her. It wasn’t long before she plunged face first into fruit, now completely oblivious of everything and everyone around her! Being so young, in the wild she would have just started moving on to solid food and so the softest fruits were the first to disappear.

Seeing so much food Bingo dives in head first.

We are not sure how long she had been away from her mother, who was likely shot for bushmeat leaving the infant alone in the clutches of the hunter. She was in very good condition however, so it is likely that it was only days before.

After hearing fellow putty-nosed guenon calls, Bingo tries to find her voice.

Once she had her fill of fruit, we brought out some milk, essential to all young orphaned primates for healthy development…..and loved by monkeys of all ages!. She gulped down the milk and now completely at ease, began bouncing all over me as if we had been best friends her whole life!

Milk is a firm favorite amoung all monkeys and helps Bingo feel more relaxed.

Before leaving, her rescuer named her Bingo. We explained to him that in the future if he ever saw another primate in a market he should not buy the animal as doing so encourages trade, rather he should report to CERCOPAN so that we can go and confiscate the orphan.

As we walked Bingo into the office, which will be her home for the next few weeks, outstretched arms appeared from every passing enclosure as all our resident adult females indicated that they wanted to be the one to hug and care for the tiny infant. Bingo must go through quarantine before being introduced to a group, but as all of our monkeys seem so desperate to mother her, she will certainly have no problem fitting in anywhere!

If you want to help CERCOPAN continue to provide a refuge for monkeys like Bingo, please support our cause today. As a non-profit organisation we rely fully on donations by caring people such as yourself to feed our ever growing primate family. With over 160 monkeys currently between our two sites we have so many mouths to feed and we just cant do it without you.

With yet another mouth to feed, CERCOPAN really needs your support!

CERCOPAN’s facebook fun (I mean fan) page

Despite the slow internet speeds in the African continent (or no net at all!), CERCOPAN has become very technically minded!  Now, in addition to our Wildlife Direct blog and our website www.cercopan.org CERCOPAN can be found to have a strong presence on Facebook.  Facebook, that has taken the world by storm in recent years, have pages dedicated to charity causes and CERCOPAN has been the proud owner of one for 8 months now, having over 750 members and having raised $175.  However now, in addition to that, we have just started a CERCOPAN fan page and it has lots of exciting topics to be investigated!

Look out for our cause page icon above, featuring Mickey the red-eared guenon

Look out for our cause page icon above, featuring Mickey the red-eared guenon

Not only can you flick through a wide range of our photos, several previously unseen, any time you wish that include the monkeys, Rhoko camp and forest, our World Environment Day celebrations, and many other categories soon to come, but you can also participate in surveys (currently to vote on what to name our new baby mangabey), start discussions with us and other fans on a variety of topics, sign up for our monthly Enewsletter, and be transferred to our shop to buy CERCOPAN products including adoption packs and posters!  Plus you can even access our Wildlife Direct blog from there though our networked blogs link!  We soon hope to bring video footage to it too so you can see the monkeys and our team in action! 

Vote on what to name Quality's new baby on our facebook fan page (Photo copyright of Oskar Brattström)

Vote on what to name Quality's new baby on our facebook fan page (Photo copyright of Oskar Brattström)

Why don’t you check it out and make further suggestions on our discussions board on what you would like to see up there?  It’s a work in progress so we would love your feedback!
Keep your eyes open for this image as its our fan page logo!

Keep your eyes open for this image as its our fan page logo!

CERCOPAN rescues bush dog from deplorable conditions

Two weeks ago, the CERCOPAN camp staff visited our host village, Iko Esai, for an evening a way from camp.  Whilst having a quiet drink in the local bar two members of the group returned having seen a small puppy in bad condition hiding under a broken umbrella.  Upon inspection we realised this puppy was in a very awful state and close to death.  She was covered in wounds and blood, and was responding very little to the activities going on around her.  The CERCOPAN staff acted quickly, finding and speaking to the owner and arranging for the puppy to return to our camp to be cared for.  She was carried carefully in a jacket for the difficult 30 minute motorbike ride to camp, through rain and flooded rivers.

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Upon arrival to camp we were able to better assess the condition of the dog and begin work on improving her welfare.  The poor thing was covered in sores and a vast number of parasites including ticks and fleas.  She was also painfully thin and extremely dehydrated.  She lay quietly as we treated her wounds and cleaned her up.  Four of us sat around her, all armed with a pair of tweezers, picking off the vast number of ticks, many of which had congregated in her ears.  The conversation with her owner had revealed that she was taken from her mother whilst still nursing and thus had grown weaker and weaker due to lack of food.  Over the coming days she was fed mainly on milk and biscuits.  We have built her up to more solid foods including rice and her now favourite dish, fish.  Our veterinary nurse came to visit her, treating her for endoparasites, such as worms, and giving us helpful advice on her further care. 

She has grown in strength over the last weeks and we get more and more excited every time she achieves new goals.  When she first arrived she was too weak to stand but in a few days we saw her little head peeking out from over her box as she stood up on her own for the first time.  She took her first steps, although wobbly, and is getting more and more inquisitive about her new environment.  She frequently tries to jump out of her box now (something we only allow when there is a volunteer to keep an eye on her) and is forging a friendship with our older camp dog, Simon, who has been particularly lonely since the passing of his camp companion Jami.

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Since her vast improvement we have negotiated with her owner and come to an agreement that she will be better as a camp dog where we can continue her much needed care.  We have not decided on her official name yet although there have been many suggestions including; Wormy, Patchy, Ticky Waka Waka and Samo (local language meaning ‘Thank You’.  However, the most commonly used is Ticky, in memory of her first night and the long hours spent using tweezers…………

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CERCOPAN’s Cute Endangered Baby Otter Update

As anybody who works with animals will say, rehabilitating orphaned babies of any species comes with its risks. Trying to raise a baby who has been separated from its mother in an unnatural environment will inevitably be a difficult task, particularly when not much is known about the species. Two weeks in to our newest member’s arrival here at CERCOPAN we were reminded first hand just how delicate a young orphan can be.

After an extremely successful first week with the orphan she suddenly came down with an overwhelming lethargy just a few days ago. Having spent so much time with her, within just a few hours of noticing subtle changes in her behaviour we knew something was wrong and enlisted the help of a number of vets from across the globe in helping to diagnose the problem. After a few hours of careful discussion it became clear that the new milk we had recently started the baby on wasn’t being metabolised correctly by her body. The specialised milk was extremely high in fat and her little body couldn’t handle it and so wasn’t taking in any of the essential nutrients she needed. It was decided to begin treating the baby with an oral fluid therapy to keep her well hydrated and to switch her back immediately to the soy infant milk she had been taking before and to ensure she got plenty of rest. We watched and waited overnight desperately willing her to make it through the crucial first 12 hours and to our amazement she woke up the following day markedly improved. From that point on she has continued to gradually improve becoming more and more active and alert every day.

We have worked tirelessly around the clock to ensure she gets all of the milk, fluids and rest she needs to continue getting better. Whilst she is not quite out of the woods yet, we are delighted with the progress she has made over the past few days, she has proved herself to be a little fighter. She still experiences periods of increased lethargy but these are now interspersed with prolonged play sessions and a very healthy appetite and we are confident she will continue to go from strength to strength over the next few days.

We would like to thank everybody who has assisted us in diagnosing the otter over the past few days. The advice we have been given has been invaluable and we are almost certain she would not be here had we not received such help from Grace and the IOSF, Spanish vet Ainare, Vet Wendy Simpson in the States and Peter from Pandrullus here in Nigeria.

We will keep you updated on her progress and are also delighted to announce that she is officially named, “Eve”.  It is thought that the ancient Kindgom of Calabar was the original “Garden of Eden” because of its green and lush environment.  As such, we thought the name, Eve was fitting for this unique and strong willed little otter!

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CERCOPAN takes in a baby clawless otter!

On 27th June a tiny baby otter was brought into CERCOPAN after her mother was shot by fisherman in Bakasi. We think she is approximately 50 days old are are hoping to rehabiitate and release her back into Rhoko, our bush site. Immediately after she was brought in, CERCOPAN staff contacted the International Otter Survival fund in the UK who have not only provided advice on rearing the young cub, but have also offered to send special milk and vitamins out to Nigeria for her to get us started. We are also receiving advice from Helene Jacques an expert on African otters. A big thank you to them for all of their help. We are not entirely sure yet whether she is a Cape Clawless otter, a Congo Clawless otter or an intermediate between the two and to be certain we will need to wait until she is a little older and her markings become more pronounced.  Either way these otters are very rare in captivity and very little is known about them so we are recording as much information as possible. Keep checking back for photos and updates on her progress over the coming weeks.

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Maya, CERCOPAN’s rescued baby putty-nosed guenon

By: Sam Trull

Our newest orphaned arrival here at CERCOPAN finally has a name…Maya!  When she first arrived here on May 26th she was estimated to be only 6 weeks old and didn’t even have her white “putty nose” yet (see picture in previous post).  She was rescued from a local market where someone was trying to sell her for a profit after undoubtedly killing her mother.  Very shy and scared on her first day here, Maya has since become very outgoing and while she mostly enjoys the comfort of my arms, she has taken quite well to having play sessions on the couch with anyone who will give her attention.   

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It is so much fun watching her grow up and learn.  Each day she gets stronger, bigger and wiser.  She has recently started taking quite large leaps, making keeping her in-line quite difficult.  She is so curious, always wondering what different things taste like, trying to put everything in her mouth after touching it with her hands and staring at it for a second.  She is also becoming much more confident during her play sessions.  Initially, barely leaving me to venture out onto the couch, and then returning to the safety of my lap after each step.  She is now running all up and down the couch with increasing velocity and only checking in with me for a quick running leap into my arms or to have a wrestling session with my fingers. 

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Wanting to give her the attention that she needs, but still be able to keep up with all my other daily tasks often requires that she sit upon my shoulders while walking around the office or working at my desk.  Taking advantage of the sudden close proximity to my head, Maya often starts to groom me by rummaging through my hair or nibbling on my ears.  To say that this is adorable is an understatement and while I will be happy on the day that she joins one of our putty groups here in Calabar, I know that it will be hard to let her go.  I look forward to sleeping a little more and having cleaner clothes, but I will miss her calling for me, snuggling into my chest and most of all knowing that I am doing everything I can to make up for the tragedy she has already experienced at such a young age. 

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Because of CERCOPAN Maya has a ‘mother’, she has a safe place to live, all the food she could want and most importantly, because of CERCOPAN, Maya has a chance. 

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New arrival!

All here at Cercopan are delighted to announce some wonderful news: one of our resident Mangabeys, Mercy, has given birth to healthy baby infant! The new arrival, who’s sex is yet to be determined, was born during the early hours of Wednesday 10th June without any complications and has been progressing well since. Mercy has proven herself to be a very watchful and attentive parent, as has the baby’s father, Callistus, who is being duly protective. We are all exceptionally pleased with how well the baby has been integrated into the group so far. Brother, Marley, has been seen grooming the child as has the unrelated Mangabey, Peace, who is also due to give birth any day. We will be keeping a watchful eye on this special new arrival to ensure it continues to progress so well and eagerly anticipate the birth of Peace’s infant within the next few days. We have posted a few pictures of the baby Mangabey below but keep checking the blog for further pictures and updates!

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